Laser-Tag vs Paintball

What is the difference between paintball and laser tag and how do they compare?

Our laser tag provides:

  • Anti-cheating technology
  • Favourable Legal Position
  • Broader Market
  • Challenges existing Paintball Players
  • Extended Weapons Range

Anti-Cheating Features

Because the laser tag gun automatically turns itself off when the player has been hit the allocated number of times, this prevents cheating. In paintball, even if the player wasn’t meaning to cheat it is often hard in the middle of a fire-fight to register that I’ve been knocked out of the game and it might take me a few seconds to take one’s finger off the trigger, during which time another I let off another 10 rounds. Enough, perhaps, to disable my opponent.

Once tagged out, the player must return to their base so the referee can re-activate them.

Favourable Legal Position

Because laser tag equipment is not considered firearms or even replicas, there are far less legal issues. In some parts of the world paintball is outlawed or restricted to people above a certain age. Likewise other incidents – some life threatening have been associated with paintball weapons being unlawfully or unsafely discharged.

Broader Market

Laser tag attracts a much broader market. The young and mid teens market are extremely keen on combat games having been brought up on computer games such as Counter-Strike and the like. The young-mid teen market is also impacted by parental concern about safety. Due to the price, safety and often-legal advantages, laser tag wins in the young-teens market every time against paintball.

For example the Scout Association rules state:

Rule 43.9 Paintball Games. Members of the Movement may not take part in the activity known as ‘Paintball’ (or any similar activity). Paintball games may not take place on property owned or leased by, or used in the name of, the Scout Movement.
Rule 43.9A Laser Games. Laser Games remain an optional Scouting activity without age limit with the knowledge of parents.

 

Extended Range

The accurate range advantage is an important reason why outdoor laser tag technology attracts people looking for a better combat simulation system and is the reason many of the military have turned to infrared technology. By having extended range, laser tag missions are often played over much larger areas than is typical with paintball.
Paintball fields generally have to be small, otherwise the limited range really makes the game quite unsatisfactory to the players, because people in clear view cannot be hit, simply because they are 150ft (60 meters) away.

Large battlefields also mean that they whole style of play is enhanced allowing realistic patrols and ambushes. Team play is more challenging over larger areas and the need for radio communications between players adds a whole new dimension to the game.

Paint pellets also have a habit of veering off course after 100ft, so while it’s possible to mark an enemy at near 150ft, it is a lucky shot. With laser skirmish, on the other hand the beam is in a totally straight line, so making hits at 600ft is a matter of skill not good luck.

That said, laser tag, can certainly still be played very effectively over small areas such as the size of a football field. Close quarters combat games are a lot of fun!

Our experience is that laser tag attracts people looking to enjoy the thrill of the competition, the use of their skills and team camaraderie. And once in the game many players immerse themselves into the tactics and team play and can experience an adrenalin rush from the psychological experience of victory…